What the self-employed can do in Cuba

The Cuban government has published a list of the types of licenses which will be available to the self-employed under the economic reform. I’m not aware of any other English translation of this list. The translation below is very approximate: Some of the words aren’t used at all in Mexican Spanish. Others may be used differently. And many of the words have several possible meanings, so that, in the context of the list, it’s hard to tell which one is intended. But despite the shortcomings of the translation, it should serve to give readers an accurate general picture.

The Spanish-language list may be found here.

List of authorized activities for the exercise of self employment

Activities

1. Tuner and repairer of musical instruments

2. Waterer

3. Bricklayer

4. Renter of animals

5. Renter of suits

6. Sharpener

7. Party host, clowns or magicians

8. Mule driver

9. Craftsman

10. Sawyer

11. Child care provider

12. Barber

13. Embroiderer, weaver

14. Cart driver

15. Singer

16. Carpenter

17. Fork-lift driver

18. Locksmith.

19. Automotive dent repairer

20. Collector/payer

21. Providing a cart pulled by animals for children

22. Buyer and seller of music

23. Buyer and seller of used books

24. Builder/seller or installer of radio and television antennas

25. Builder/seller or repairer of wicker items

26. Breeder/seller of pets

27. Window installer

28. Caretaker of animals

29. Caretaker of public bathrooms

30. Caretaker for the sick, the disabled, or the elderly

31. Caretaker of parks

32. Tanner (except cow leather)

33. Decorator

34. Trimmer of palmtrees

35. Producer/seller of food and drink by means of gastronomic service. (Paladares). Exercises the activity in their home, through the use of tables, stools and so on up to a capacity of twenty.

36. Producer/seller of food and non-alcoholic drink in one’s home

37. Producer/seller of food and non-alcoholic drink on a retail basis in one’s home or as a street vendor

38. Procuer/seller of food and non-alcoholic drink on a retail basis from a fixed place of sale. (Cafeteria).

39. Producer/seller of charcoal

40. Producer/seller of wines

41. Producer/seller of yokes, yokepads and ropes

42. Electrician

43. Automotive electrician

44. Caretaker, cleaner and “turbinero” of real estate [I could find no translation for the word turbinero.]

45. Bookbinder

46. Coiler of motors, electrical coils and other equipment

47. Animal trainer

48. Maker/seller of wreaths and flowers

49. Sower of buttons

50. Photographer

51. Washer/greaser of automotive equipment

52. Travel agent

53. Engraver/writer of objects

54. Blacksmith for animals or maker/seller of horseshoes and nails

55. Automotive body repair person

56. Driving instructor

57. Sports trainer (except martial arts)

58. Gardener

59. Washer or ironer

60. Woodcutter

61. Shoe shiner

62. Cleaner and tester of spark plugs

63. Cleaner and repairer of ditches

64. Manicurist

65. Make up worker

66. Masseuse

67. Putty worker

68. Mechanic for refrigeration equipment

69. Typist

70. Messenger

71. Dressmaker or taylor

72. Miller

73. Sound operator

74. Air compressor operator, operator or repairer of pneumatic drills

75. Operator of children’s recreation equipment

76. Valet, caretaker of automotive equipment, cycles and tricycles

77. Hairdresser

78. Hairdresser for pets

79. Domestic worker

80. Automotive painter

81. Painter of furniture or varnisher

82. Housepainter

83. Sign painter

84. Fish farmer

85. Sculptor

86. Plumber

87. Well digger

88. Maker/seller of articles for home use

89. Maker/seller of rubber accessories

90. Maker/seller of pottery

91. Maker/seller or collector/seller of things made of ceramics or other materials, with a constructive purpose.

92. Maker/seller of religious articles (except items which have a cultural value according to the Ministry of Culture) and seller of animals for these purposes

93. Curtain rods, curtains and mountings

94. Maker/seller of costume jewelry of metal and other natural resources

95. Maker/seller of footwear

96. Maker/seller of brooms, brushes and similar items

97. Maker/seller of plastic figurines

98. Producer/seller of flowers and ornamental plants

99. Producer/seller of piñatas and other similar articles for birthdays

100. Producer/collector/seller of plants for animal food or producer/collector/seller of medicinal herbs

101. Instructor in music and other arts

102. Instructor in shorthand, typing and languages

103. Computer programmer

104. Metal polisher

105. Collector/seller of natural resources

106. Collector/seller of raw materials

107. Watch repairer

108. Repairer of leather articles and similar things

109. Jewelry repairer

110. Repairer of bed frames

111. Repairer of automotive batteries

112. Bicycle repairer

113. Repairer of costume jewelry

114. Repairer of fences and paths

115. Repairer of kitchens

116. Repairer of mattresses

117. Repairer of small implements

118. Repairer of office equipment

119. Repairer of electrical and electronic equipment

120. Repairer of mechanical and combustion equipment

121. Repairer of looking glasses

122. Repairer of sewing machines

123. Repairer of saddles and tack

124. Repairer of umbrellas and parasols

125. Repairer and recharger of cigarette lighters

126. Tutor. Not including active teachers

127. Restorer of dolls and other toys

128. Art restorer

129. Doormen for residential buildings

130. Solderer

131. Saddler

132. Upholsterer

133. Roofer

134. Book keeper. (Accountants and middle technicians in accountancy with a work connection to the specialty are excepted)

135. Dyers of textiles

136. Lathe operator

137. Roaster

138. Temporary agricultural worker

139. Translator of documents

140. Sheep shearer

141. Thresher

142. Seller of agricultural products in points of sale or booths

143. Repair cobbler

144. Contract worker (hired by the official self-employed worker to work with him)

145. Leaser of housing, residences, and spaces which are an integral part of the housing

146. Producer/seller of food and drink through gastronomic services with special characteristics of the Chinese neighborhood.

147. Service of trips in the colonial carriages

148. Private contractors

Customary figures

149. Habanera dancers

150. Card-reading fortune teller

151. Folkloric dance artist

152. Musical group “Los Mambises”

153. Cartoonists

154. Sellers of artificial flowers

155. Street painters

156. Dandy [This word appears as “Dandy” in the original. From the context it seems to be some sort of street entertainer.]

157. Hair braiders

158. Peeler of natural fruits

159. Dance duo “Amor”

160. Dance partnership “Benny More”

161. Shower of trained dogs

162. Musical duo “Los amigos”

163. Walk ons

164. Traditional hairdresser

Transport of cargo and passengers

165. Trucks

166. Pick up trucks

167. Panel trucks

168. Bus

169. Microbus

170. Cars

171. Rail methods

172. Jeeps

173. Boats for passenger transportation

174. Motorcycles

175. Tricycles

Animal and human powered

176. Small carts

177. Coaches

178. Bicycles

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2 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    […] was originally posted on the blog run by Professor Toad. I would like to thank him for taking time out of his day in order to publish this important piece […]

  2. 2

    discount drapery fabrics

    What the self-employed can do in Cuba | Professor Toad’s Blog


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